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Thursday, May 14, 2020 | History

2 edition of Hohokam, Sinagua and the Hakataya found in the catalog.

Hohokam, Sinagua and the Hakataya

Albert H. Schroeder

Hohokam, Sinagua and the Hakataya

by Albert H. Schroeder

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Published by I.V.C. Museum Society in [El Centro, Calif.] .
Written in English

    Subjects:
  • Hohokam culture.,
  • Sinagua culture.,
  • Indians of North America -- Arizona.

  • Edition Notes

    Statementwith a new introd. by Kenneth Hedges.
    Series[I.V.C. Museum Society] Occasional paper -- no. 3., An I.V.C. Museum Society publication, Occasional paper (I.V.C. Museum Society) -- no. 3., I.V.C. Museum Society publication
    The Physical Object
    Paginationiv, 143 p.
    Number of Pages143
    ID Numbers
    Open LibraryOL16492188M

    Download the Hohokam Fact Sheet ( MB) O’odham peoples of the Sonoran Desert refer to their ancestors, from time immemorial to the present, as Huhugam. Archaeologists recognize the material culture of the ancestors who lived from about A.D. to —which researchers call “Hohokam”—as something distinct from what came before and. The Hohokam probably prepared cactus in much the same way as the Pimas and Papagos do. After removing the needles, cholla buds and prickly pear pads were baked slowly in pits. Cholla buds were also boiled. The Hohokam cooked down saguaro fruit into syrup and made cakes from the dried seed. They probably made wine from the syrup.

    The Hohokam peoples occupied a wide area of south-central Arizona from roughly Flagstaff south to the Mexican border. They are thought to have originally migrated north out of Mexico around BC to become the most skillful irrigation farmers the Southwest ever knew. M. Expanded northward coming in contact with the Sinagua N. About CE Anasazi (Pueblo) influences swept over Sinagua, taking the Hohokam with them O. About another Pueblo group, the Saladoans of East Central Arizona migrated into Hohokam territory P.

    The Hohokam ventured up canyons to gather acorns and pinyon nuts and to collect leaves of bear grass and sotol for making baskets. Before they started growing agave extensively (around A.D. or so), the Hohokam found those plants at higher elevations. After they cut the leaves off, they dug up the bases, or hearts, of the agaves, then slow. From the Olmec to the Maya to the Aztec, ballgames were one of the defining activities of Mesoamerican cultures. But it’s possible these games weren’t limited to Mesoamerica. Archaeologists have found more than oval-shaped earthen depressions at Hohokam sites .


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Hohokam, Sinagua and the Hakataya by Albert H. Schroeder Download PDF EPUB FB2

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Colton, in his various publications on the Sinagua, also demonstrated that the Hohokam up to about A.D. and the Sinagua from to A.D., inhabited the middle Verde Valley, an area situated between the Gila Basin of southern Arizona and the San Francisco Mountains of northern by: 7.

PREFACE In my paper on the Hohokam, Sinagua, and the Hakataya (), I remarked that used an approach of a "scheme of patterns, which considers traits both in time and space" to form "a historical basis on which to work.

It I also noted that "patterns in time and space must be distinguished before folk and complex cultures can be separated. I' A major concern. Cite this Record. Hohokam, Sinagua and the Hakataya. Albert H. Schroeder.

Imperial Valley College Museum Occasional Papers,1. Sinagua and the Hakataya book Centro, CA: Imperial Valley College Museum Society. (tDAR id:. A comparison of Hohokam and Sinagua traits in the Middle Verde Valley, pp. Correlations and discussions, pp.

The Hakataya root, pp. Ethnological situations in relation to the prehistory of the Hakataya root, pp. Appendix I: brief site descriptions, pp. Appendix II: description of new pottery types, pp. Hohokam (/ h oʊ h oʊ ˈ k ɑː m /) was a society located in the North American Southwest, in the areas now part of Arizona and Sonora, m practiced a specific culture, sometimes referred to as Hohokam culture, which has been distinguished by who practiced this culture can be called Sinagua and the Hakataya book as well, but more often they are distinguished as Hohokam people to.

The Hohokam represent one of the largest and most complex societies in the Southwest. At the cultural peak of the Hohokam in the “Classic” period of the A.D. s through s, there were tens of thousands of Hohokam people living in large villages.

Cultural neighbors. Patayan culture is sometimes known as the Hakataya nearest cultural neighbors were the Hohokam in central and eastern Arizona. The historic Yuman-speaking peoples in this region were skilled warriors and active traders, maintaining exchange networks with the Pima in southern Arizona and with the Californian Pacific Coast tribes.

The Hohokam were a prehistoric people that inhabited the Sonoran desert of central Arizona from about AD to AD Occupying the region around modern-day Phoenix along the Salt and Gila Rivers, the Hohokam were one of several relatively advanced cultures in. HOHOKAM.

HOHOKAM is the name given by archaeologists to a prehistoric culture centered along the Salt, Gila, Verde, and Santa Cruz Rivers in the low, hot Sonoran desert of southern Arizona between approximately b.c. and a.d. The name Hohokam means "those who have gone" in the language of the O'odham, the contemporary Native American inhabitants of southern Arizona.

The Classic Period of Hohokam culture is notable for the peaceful intrusion of the Salado tribe, a branch of the Ancestral Pueblo (Anasazi) culture. They came from the upper reaches of the Salt River, lived in Hohokam territory for several decades, then withdrew and principal effect of their presence is revealed in the advent of Pueblo architecture in Hohokam territory.

The Hohokam tradition, which spanned some years – from early in the first millennium to A. – seems to have materialized from a void and vanished into darkness. In between, the Hohokam made the Sonoran Desert bloom. The book describes the fascinating desert world of the Hohokam, a brief history of Hohokam archaeology (platform mounds, big houses, and ball courts), craft arts, rock arts, and their religion and special events.

It is an interesting tale with many mysteries, hopefully to be solved by the current archeology by: 6. Proceedings of the Hohokam Conference (Contributions to Anthropological Studies No 2) by Hohokam Conference Arizona State UniversityBurton, Susan Sasse, Laughlin, Minnabell and a great selection of related books, art and collectibles available now at They brought whole new “trait complexes,” which they blended with the patterns of the subject peoples (“pattern diffusion”).

Modern-day pre-Hohokam groups include the Yuman, Quechan, Patayan, Sinagua, Cohonina and Laquish. Toltec is commemorated in the name.

Chapter 15 by Donald M. Bahr. Bahr discusses how O'odham perceive their relationship to the Hohokam. Much of O'odham oral tradition references Hohokam ruins and states that the O'odham conquered the Hohokam. Bahr argues that relative importance of the Hohokam in O'odham oral tradition suggests that there is a connection between the two groups/5(6).

By Caitlyn Carrillo The Hohokam were a prehistoric people, who lived in the southern desert regions of what is now Arizona. Remnants of the Hohokam culture are found in the Southwest Culture Area. Anthropologists and archaeologists use culture areas to differentiate geographical regions based on cultural similarities.[1] Developing a chronology for the Hohokam has proven.

About this Item: University of Arizona Press, Tucson, Softcover. Condition: New. Century Collection Series. pages. Softcover. New book. ARCHAEOLOGY. "For a calculated 1, years, Snaketown was a viable village, but unlike so many tells in the Near East, the people remained the same while their culture changed.

The Problem of Hohokam, Sinagua and Salado Relation in Southern Arizona. Plateau 26(2) The Hohokam, Sinagua, and the Hakataya.

Imperial Valley College Occasional Paper No. 3, El Centro. Reprint of Schroeder’s Archives of Archaeology,No. 5 report. The Pueblo Indians are not thought to be related to the Hohokam just the Anasazi, Sinagua and Mogollon.

The modern Pueblo dry land farm like the Anasazi especially in the western Pueblos. Known today as the Hohokam (ho-ho-kam), these people built villages close to streams in order to farm the region's rich bottomlands.

They lived in the basin from about A.D. to The Tucson Basin villagers were part of the larger Hohokam world, whose inhabitants lived in the Sonoran Desert of southern Arizona.The Hohokam, the prehistoric farmers of the southern Arizona desert, have been the subject of increased archaeological investigation in the last two decades.

This research is altering traditional views of the Hohokam. New data provide a stronger basis for discussing Hohokam origins and culture by: Hohokam Irrigation Visualization by Robert B.

Ciaccio. People in the Hohokam region employed massive-scale irrigation farming. Their vast canal networks include some canals more than 20 miles long. There are more than miles of documented canals in the region, representing the largest-scale irrigation in North America.

European settlers.